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Turn an RC car into a floor sweeper

Turn an RC car into a floor sweeper

Whats fun, cheap, good looking, and cleans a hardwood floor with an advanced search and navigation algorithm? An electrostatic dust mop attached to a radio-controlled car. Vroom!

This combination has some things in common with a Roomba, but is arguably less expensive. It’s quick and fun to build, and quick and fun to operate. 

Our starting point was a $15 radio controlled Lamborghini Gallardo from our local (and strangely enough, haunted) toysaurus. (Speaking of which, isn’t this a great looking police car? ) 
The second major component is the business end of an electrostatic dust mop, such as a Swiffer, or the equivalent model from 3M that we’re using here. 

Construction is pretty straightforward: Figure out a way to attach the dust mop to the car! 

Let’s get started by taking the body off of the car. Thankfully, everything is held together by screws. After removing the body, take a look at the front end of the chassis (the right side in the photos) and try to find a place where we can begin to attach a mount to the dust mop end. 
It turns out that there’s a neat little ledge– with a screw hole even– right by the front bumper. So, we’ll build a little plank to hold the dust mop that attaches to that screw hole. 

I built the mop-support plank from a blank printed circuit board. (You can use a piece of metal or plastic for this, but I happen to have these lying around!) Blank PCBs are a good construction material because they are (1) cheap, (2) very strong and light fiberglass-epoxy composite, (3) flame retardant, (4) easy to cut to shape, (5) often supplied with holes in them, and (6) ready to be soldered.
I added one hole to match the screw hole on the ledge, as well as six holes to mount the mop end. I also had to trim the outline a bit to fit the plank onto the ledge. (Your car may vary.)

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