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Ultrasonic Anemometer Part 21: Standalone Anemometer Hardware

Ultrasonic Anemometer Part 21: Standalone Anemometer Hardware

Last time I went through the design of my new standalone anemometer. Now it’s time to build this thing and see if it works as planned.

After I fried a couple of chips on my driver circuit testing board due to a wrong chip in the power supply I was a bit more careful this time and built up the board step by step.

20160426_StandaloneAnemometer_016

Only after I confirmed that the power supply was ok I dared to solder some more.

20160426_StandaloneAnemometer_019

The next step was to add the PIC32 with the crystal, the programming header and all the caps they need. This is a chip family that I’ve never used before so I wanted to first see if I can program it. All went well and I managed to get it to run on the crystal’s 8MHz boosted up to 40MHz by an internal PLL. So I was ready for the rest.

20160428_StandaloneAnemometer_031

I wrote some very basic software and confirmed that at least the basics were working ok. I was able to send and receive pulses, the pulses got amplified, the zero-crossing detector worked and so forth.

20160428_StandaloneAnemometer_024

As mentioned, I’m entirely new to the PIC32 microcontroller series. There are a lot of similarities to the PIC16 and PIC18 series that I’m quite familiar with but still it’s always a challenge to work with a new family of chips and the tools that come with it. I took me the better part of an afternoon to master the vectored interrupts with the different priority levels and so on.

20160428_StandaloneAnemometer_040

Driver circuit (front) and standalone anemometer (back) side by side.

By the way, with this project I’m using the free MPLAB X IDE with the also free XC32 C compiler from Microchip. So anyone is able to write, modify or compile code for this thing with free software. At least at the moment you need a programmer to actually burn the chip. But the PICkit3 only costs around 50 dollars and my idea is to write a USB bootloader so that any user can modify the software of a pre-programmed board.

20160514_StandaloneAnemometer_050

So now comes what I think might be the hardest part: Getting the USB to work. I’ve spent quite a few hours so far but haven’t managed to get it working properly yet. If anyone has experience with this kind of software development – Let me know, any help is highly appreciated.

It now works: Click here to view it.

Read more Here







 

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